Monster Eggs: Seasonal Fine Motor Activity

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We’ve been learning all about our body this October. These silly little monster egg faces were a great way to bring the fun of Halloween together with our months theme. Plus, peeling the eggs was an accidentally awesome fine motor skill for the boys. We may have lost half of the eggs in the process, but they really worked those tiny finger muscles.

If you can make hard boiled eggs you can make these monster eggs.
Just hard boil some eggs, lightly tap eggs to create cracks all over, and then soak in dyed water for at least a couple of hours. Peel and voila, you’ve got monster/dragon/dinosaur eggs.

If you’ve got some Mr. Potato head pieces you can then make the little faces too!

Monster Slime: Marvelously Messy Sensory Play

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Sensory Play is an essential part of early childhood learning and getting messy is one great way to involve all of the senses-enter EDIBLE MONSTER SLIME!

Spending time stimulating their senses helps children develop cognitively, linguistically, socially and emotionally, physically and creatively.

PBS Parents Website

There a tons of Edible Slime Recipes online, but really it just needs to be green and goopy. The edible part is pretty important here because my 20 month old will be joining in the fun and he can’t help but use his sense of taste!  I had planned on making the Chia Slime recipe on the link above, but when I got to the store and realized that Xantham Gum was $13 for a small container I decided a less slime like recipe with cornstarch would be just fine.

On Chia Seeds:
I feel like the Chia Seeds I’ve been using in my cookies, oatmeal, and cereal have been keeping a secret from me. In addition to having manifold health benefits, these tiny seeds turn into fabulously slimy little tapioca-esque beads.

No-Cook Edible Chia Seed Slime Recipe:
Baby Spiders
1/2 cup Chia Seeds mixed with 1 cup of warm water and allowed to “grow” for at least an hour
Monster Boogers
1/2 cup corn starch mixed with green food coloring and between 2 tbsp and 1/4 cup of water. Just play with the ratio until the mixture is thick enough to pick.

I had the boys “pick the monster boogers” and put them into the baby spider brew –classy I know.

Then I went to the kitchen and pulled out anything edible that looked remotely ewwy, gooey, creepy, or crawly.

Add-ins:
-Frozen Peas “Frozen Bugs”-these are so great for sensory contrast of hot/cold
-Green sprinkles
-Karo Syrup –this really invited their sense of taste
-Lentils

Utensils:
Having an assortment of cups, bowls, spoons, and whisks allows little ones to experiment with moving the slime from one place to another.

¡WARNING!
Do not do this inside unless you want a seriously impossible mess to clean up.
I recommend any location where you can clean up by simply hosing everything-including the kids-down after you’re all done. The food coloring I used even stained their hands a bit and took some scrubbing to get off, but we had fun 🙂

Go Away, Big Green Monster! Monster Face Craft

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It’s October! Monsters, skeletons, and Jack-o-lanterns are the perfect spooky characters to help us learn “All About the Body”. This week we’ve been learning about the face- the features, where they are, and what they do.

The book Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberly is the perfect book to bring together learning and Halloween fun. Each page of the book features a different part of I’ve monster’s face. After reading the book I had the boys identify each part of the face and glue it on the monster in the correct location (well in Patrick’s case not quite correct). The other great thing about the book is its broad appeal. Ages birth-5+ would enjoy and learn from “Go Away, Big Green Monster”.

I just cut out the pieces the night before. The “long blueish green nose” was just blue because come one-who has teal construction paper. You could cut the purple hair out squiggly looking, but I thought it’d be a good fine motor activity for Maxwell to squiggle his own.

This activity is great for teaching:
—Position words (the nose goes ABOVE the mouth BELOW the eyes etc)
—Facial Features (I had Patrick 20 months point to each part of his face)
—Fine motor skills (squeezing the glue and precisely placing the pieces)
—Literacy (the book is pretty simple but great)

This video on YouTube is a great extension song-the boys ask for “the monster song” all the time.
Video: Go Away,  Scary Monster! Go Away!